How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live

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* Book: Jeff Jarvis. Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live.

Introduction

Jeff Jarvis

"I turn to my real subject, publicness, examining the benefits, its history, the ethic surrounding sharing, whether one can share too much, how much we share, the sharing industry that is growing around us, imagining radically public companies, and imagining transparent and collaborative government. I look at the history of other tools of publicness, primarily the Gutenberg press, to get a sense of the scope of change and opportunity we face. At the end, I argue strenuously for the need to protect our tools of publicness from control by tyrants, censors, companies, governments, and over-regulation." (https://docs.google.com/document/d/15TSxLP0It7mZoPNDIdUNqkPHoN2XYzSqyCCbdjm-2XM/edit?hl=en_US)


Discussion

By Megan Garber:

"One of Morozov’s blanket complaints about Public Parts is a valid one: Very little in the book is terribly surprising. And that’s largely because much of it has been said already, publicly, by Jarvis himself. The professor has been preaching publicness for years — at Buzzmachine, in his Guardian column, at conferences, on TV, on Twitter, on the radio, on his Tumblr. If you follow Jeff Jarvis, you follow Public Parts. You’ve seen his thoughts on publicness take shape over time. The book that resulted from that public process — the private artifact — is secondary. It is the commercial result of a communal endeavor.

Which is another way of saying that what’s being sold on the book market is not just Public Parts, but Jeff Jarvis. Authors are, increasingly, products." (http://www.niemanlab.org/2011/10/public-parts-and-its-public-parts-in-a-networked-world-can-a-book-go-viral/)


More Information

Negative by Evgeny Morozov: http://www.tnr.com/print/article/books/magazine/96116/the-internet-intellectual