Category:P2P State Approaches

From P2P Foundation
Jump to: navigation, search

This section will be further developed:


Contents

Introduction

  • Hilary Wainwright:
  1. Co-Creative Labor, Productive Democracy and the Partner State; a very important text to reset government policies for the p2p age. The 3 parts cover: 1 A value revolution in labor; 2 Re-constituting industrial strategies based on co-creative labor; 3 The Co-Creative Economy needs a Partner State


  • Michel Bauwens:
  1. The basic orientation of p2p theory towards societal reform: transforming civil society, the private and the state
  2. To the Finland Station: the political approach of P2P Theory


  • Tommaso Fattori:
  1. The Public - Commons Partnership and the Commonification of that which is Public.
  2. Towards a Legal Framework for the Commons


  • Vasilis Kostakis:
  1. At the Turning Point of the Current Techno-Economic Paradigm: Commons-Based Peer Production, Desktop Manufacturing and the Role of Civil Society in the Perezian Framework. tripleC 11(1): 173-190, 2013. URL = http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/463/447
  2. The Parody of the Commmons. tripleC 11(2): 412-424, 2013. URL = http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/article/view/484
  3. The Political Economy of Information Production in the Social Web: Towards a “Partner State Approach”. TUT Press, 2011. URL = http://digi.lib.ttu.ee/i/?610

Key Concepts

  1. The key concept we propose is that of the Partner State

Help us develop the following concepts:

Other key concepts:

Citations

Public-commons partnership is a means of de-privatization while public-private partnership is a means of privatization.

- Poor Richard (Facebook, October 2012)


Commons-Public rather than Public-Commons

"We should link up social-public partnership and Commons-Public Partnerships. The important point to highlight is that social or commons must precede the state. Our elected representatives need to become again public servants and arrogant masters need to be rapidly recalled." (email, February 2014)

- Pat Conaty


David Graeber on Markets and States

"This is a great trap of the twentieth century: on one side is the logic of the market, where we like to imagine we all start out as individuals who don’t owe each other anything. On the other is the logic of the state, where we all begin with a debt we can never truly pay. We are constantly told that they are opposites, and that between them they contain the only real human possibilities. But it’s a false dichotomy. States created markets. Markets require states. Neither could continue without the other, at least, in anything like the forms we would recognize today." (http://p2pfoundation.net/First_Five_Thousand_Years_of_Debt)

Key Resources

Key Articles

Key Books

  • Reclaim the State. Adventures in Popular Democracy. By Hilary Wainwright. Seagull, 2009


Historical Approaches


  • The Sovereign State and Its Competitors: An Analysis of Systems Change. Hendrik Spruyt. Princeton University Press, 1996. [2]: "The present international system, composed for the most part of sovereign, territorial states, is often viewed as the inevitable outcome of historical development. Hendrik Spruyt argues that there was nothing inevitable about the rise of the state system, however. Examining the competing institutions that arose during the decline of feudalism--among them urban leagues, independent communes, city states, and sovereign monarchies."

See also: Coercion, Capital and European States: AD 990 - 1992. Charles Tilly: "In this pathbreaking work, now available in paperback, Charles Tilly challenges all previous formulations of state development in Europe. Specifically, Tilly charges that most available explanations fail because they do not account for the great variety of kinds of states which were viable at different stages of European history, and because they assume a unilinear path of state development resolving in today's national state."

Key Videos

Pages in category "P2P State Approaches"

The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 248 total.

(previous 200) (next 200)

4

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

O cont.

P

R

(previous 200) (next 200)